Looking for a Pulumi book?

Pulumi in Action is available now in early access

Good news, friends! I’m writing a book.

In Pulumi in Action, I’ll be writing about how to use Pulumi, the open-source project I work on full time, to build cloud applications and infrastructure with TypeScript and Amazon Web Services. I’m incredibly excited about this book — it’s my first — so I’m writing this post as a public expression of that excitement. (My wife often says I don’t often emote as much as I should, so I’m attaching an appropriately celebratory emoji as well, lest we be left with any lingering doubt. 🎉)

As of now, I’ve only written the first few chapters, but since the book is the first ever focused on Pulumi, my publisher, Manning, wanted to release it as a work-in-progress through MEAP, excellent early-access program. Thanks to them, you can both read and purchase — or if you like, read and not purchase — the book today, and as new chapters roll out, at around once a month, you’ll get access to them immediately, in all of today’s finest digital formats. It’ll cover a lot of surface area — infrastructure as code, Pulumi itself, cloud-native software development and delivery patterns, and more — and is generally aimed at helping full-stack developers get a solid foothold into the cloud. You can read the first chapter for free on manning.com today, and browse all of the examples (in multiple languages, including Python, Go, and C#) on GitHub. The print version is scheduled to ship sometime early next year, and should come in at around 300 pages.

So that’s it — that’s the post. I had written around two thousand words recounting the tale of how it was that I, a full-stack web developer, came to write a book about infrastructure-as-code, but my wife, upon reading those words, declared that most of them were unnecessary: what mattered, she pointed out, was what was in the book. So I’ll save the full backstory for the eventual preface, and for now, leave you with this: if you’re a full-stack developer, you should check out Pulumi, and when you’re ready to learn more, I’ll be here.

Enjoy — and let me know what you think!

PS: A talk I gave recently

At last year’s CascadiaJS here in Seattle, I gave a talk on infrastructure as code, along with a demo of using Pulumi and TypeScript to build a fun little serverless app. It’s about 25 minutes long, but it should give you an idea of the sort of material I’ll be covering in the book.